Cardiovascular Nutrition

Handpicked Articles From Your Cardiologist

What Is a Whole-Food, Plant-Based Diet?

A whole-food, plant-based diet is centered on whole, unrefined, or minimally refined plants. It’s a diet based on fruits, vegetables, tubers, whole grains, and legumes; and it excludes or minimizes meat (including chicken and fish), dairy products, and eggs, as well as highly refined foods like bleached flour, refined sugar, and oil.

Nutritarian Diet

The theory: Through his six books on healthful eating, including the 2011 “Eat to Live: The Amazing Nutrient-Rich Program for Fast and Sustained Weight Loss,” Dr. Joel Fuhrman, a family physician and president of the Nutritional Research Foundation, builds his program on findings from more than two decades of research on…

The Ornish Diet

The theory: The more you change your diet, the more health benefits you reap. If you’re only looking to lose a few pounds, a couple of this-for-thats might do the trick. But if you want to reverse heart disease – which research shows may be possible at the rigorous end of this diet’s spectrum of choices – you’re looking at at big changes.

Mediterranean Diet

The theory: It’s generally accepted that the folks in countries bordering the Mediterranean Sea live longer and suffer less than most Americans from cancer and cardiovascular ailments. The not-so-surprising secret is an active lifestyle, weight control, and a diet low in red meat, sugar and saturated fat and high in produce,…

American Heart Association Recommendations

You may be eating plenty of food, but your body may not be getting the nutrients it needs to be healthy. Nutrient-rich foods have minerals, protein, whole grains and other nutrients but are lower in calories. They may help you control your weight, cholesterol and blood pressure. Eat an overall healthy dietary pattern that emphasizes:

Cardiovascular Excercise

Great Articles From The Experts

American Heart Association Recommendations for Physical Activity in Adults

Being physically active is important to prevent heart disease and stroke, the nation’s No. 1 and No. 5 killers. To improve overall cardiovascular health, we suggest at least 150 minutes per week of moderate exercise or 75 minutes per week of vigorous exercise (or a combination of moderate and vigorous activity).

Being active when you have heart disease

Getting regular exercise when you have heart disease is important. Exercise can make your heart muscle stronger. It may also help you be more active without chest pain or other symptoms. Exercise may help lower your blood pressure and cholesterol. If you have diabetes, it can help you control your…

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Physical activity improves quality of life

The American Heart Association recommends at least 150-minutes of moderate activity each week. An easy way to remember this is 30 minutes at least 5 days a week, but three 10-minute periods of activity are as beneficial to your overall fitness as one 30-minute session. This is achievable!

Documentaries

Good For The Heart And The Mind

In the 13 years since Super Size Me, the fast-food industry has undergone a makeover. Today, chain restaurants tout food that’s “healthy,” “organic,” and “natural.” Filmmaker Morgan Spurlock explores this new reality with an approach even more immersive and subversive than that used for his first film: he sets out to open his own chicken franchise.

Cardiology

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Jesal V. Popat, M.D., FACC, of the Florida Medical Clinic is a board-certified cardiologist that specializes in cardiovascular disease, internal medicine, interventional cardiology

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